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Beginner's Guide to Propulsion and EngineSim
Fuel and Air Relationships
Answers


1. Find the volume of the air:

At sea level, the density of air is 1.222 kilograms per cubic meter. There are 454.5 grams per pound which gives 28.35 grams per ounce. So 1.222 kilograms is equal to 43.1 oz of air occupying 1 cubic meter. One cubic meter is equal to 35.336 cubic feet. Therefore, one cubic foot of air contains 1.2304 ounces and 1000 ounces of air will occupy 813 cubic feet.

2. Find the volume of jet fuel (17 ounces of jet fuel at 62.5% weight of water):

For water, one cubic foot weighs 62.4 pounds and one pint equals one pound. So one cubic foot contains 62.4 pints. There are 16 oz. in a pint, so one cubic foot of water contains 998.4 oz. Jet fuel is 62.5% the weight of water, so one cubic foot of jet fuel contains 624 oz. Therefore, 17 oz of jet fuel will take up .027 cubic feet.

 3. What is the ratio of the volume of fuel/volume of air?

The ratio of the volumes is 813/.027 which equals 30,111.

 


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Propulsion Activity Index
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Editor: Tom Benson
NASA Official: Tom Benson
Last Updated: Thu, Jun 12 04:39:27 PM EDT 2014

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