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Structures and Materials Division Research and Technology Directorate NASA Glenn Research Center

Tribology and mechanical Components Branch
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Facility Fact

Research is underway to determine surface mobility requirements for extraterrestial vehicles.


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Tribology and Mechanical Components Branch

The Tribology & Mechancial Componets Branch performs research in mechanical components and system technologies to improve the performance, reliability, and integrity of aerospace drive systems, high temperature seals, and space mechanisms.
Mission
The Tribology & Mechanical Components Branch is comprised of over 40 personnel conducting research and development in the areas of tribology (i.e. lubrication & wear) and mechanical components for current and future aerospace systems. Research efforts include advanced mechanical drive system concepts, gear dynamics and durability, Oil-Free turbomachinery, highly efficient turbine seals, thermal barrier and structural seals, habitat seals for space structures, terramechanics for lunar surface mobility, space systems lubrication, and space mechanisms. Fundamental as well as application specific research is pursued as needed to advance NASA programmatic and technological goals.

Highlights
Arc jet evaluation test of CEV Heat Shield-to-Back Shell Design  Successful Arc Jet Test of CEV Heat Shield-to-back Shell Seal Design
The seal comprises an outer hybrid thermal barrier designed to resist the extreme temperatures of reentry.
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Spiral Orbit Tribometry  Spiral Orbit Tribometry
A method of tribometry that relies on an aspect of the motion of a rolling ball that has come to be known as Spiral Orbit Tribometry.
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Commercially available PM304 bushings  PM304 Success Story
Companies manufacture and utilize bearings made of PM304 oil-free lubricant material.
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Events
Aerospace Mechanism Workshop
The symposium is held in even-numbered years, hosted by NASA centers on a rotating basis. The next Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium will be May 14-16, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland hosted by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
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NOTE CHANGE:
NASA Seals and Secondary Flows Symposium

November 19, 2013 - Postponed to Nov. 2014 due to Government Shutdown in October. Watch for new date.

Open to OEM'S and vendors
U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents (green card holders) only

Location
Ohio Aerospace Institute Link to non-NASA website

Directions/Maps
GRC (Google Maps) Link to non-NASA website
Map to GRC (PDF)
Local food/lodging (PDF)

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Last Updated: November 4, 2013